[Solution Manual] Principles of Marketing, 17th Edition by Kotler - $15.49   Add to cart

Exam (elaborations)

[Solution Manual] Principles of Marketing, 17th Edition by Kotler

Chapter 2 COMPANY AND MARKETING STRATEGY: PARTNERING TO BUILD CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT, VALUE, AND RELATIONSHIPS MARKETING STARTER: CHAPTER 2 Starbucks’s Marketing Strategy: Delivering “The Starbucks Experience” Synopsis Starbucks met with enormous early success by focusing not just on coffee but on the coffee-drinking experience. The company has since taken a bumpy ride from boom to bust and back to boom again. Along the way, it learned that a good marketing strategy means more than just growth, sales, and profits. It means skillfully engaging customers and creating value for them. At its core, Starbucks doesn’t sell just coffee, it sells “The Starbucks Experience.” After a period of frantic growth, Starbucks refocused on the “experience” and is once again fully engaged with customers. Starbucks has built customer engagement and brand community through digital and mobile platforms. It delivers the one-of-a-kind Starbucks Experience and, as a result of good performance on this objective, revenues and profits have shot up. Discussion Objective A brief discussion of the Starbucks story will help to solidify the importance of creating a company-wide marketing strategy that is customer focused, and revamping it when necessary. This theme began in Chapter 1 and continues in Chapter 2. It also provides a nice opportunity to examine overall company strategy and mission, and their relationship to marketing strategy and activities. Finally, Starbucks provides a great example of how companies are taking new directions in building customer relationships and brand community. Starbucks has almost always focused on the brand experience. In the early years, it built the brand’s image through word-of-mouth and customer focus. Now, it focuses a sizable portion of its marketing efforts on creating more personal and involving brand experiences. Starting the Discussion To make the chapter-opening Starbucks story more personally relevant to the class, begin by asking, “How many of you drink Starbucks? Has Starbucks changed its offerings in the time you have been buying its products? In what way?” After a brief opening discussion, go online with students to explore Starbucks’s website (). Direct the discussion using the following questions. As always, keep the discussion moving with plenty of student input. Discussion Questions 1. What is Starbucks really selling? What are customers really buying? How and how deeply do customers relate to the Starbucks brand? (Starbucks sells a lot more than just coffee. When customers purchase something at Starbucks, they are buying a brand experience. Ask students what that brand experience feels like to them.) 2. If you worked as a Starbucks operations manager, financial analyst, IT specialist, or human resources manager, why would it be important for you to understand Starbucks’s marketing strategy? This question digs into the relationship between corporate strategy and marketing strategy, and marketing’s role in the broader company strategy. Non-marketing students often ask, “Why do I need to understand marketing?” The answer—as noted in Chapter 1 and later in Chapter 2—everyone in the company needs to align behind the mission of creating customer value. 3. How does the chapter-opening Starbucks story relate to what comes later in the chapter? (This question transitions the discussion into Chapter 2 topics such as overall company strategy and mission, marketing’s role, customer-driven marketing strategy and planning, and measuring marketing ROI.) CHAPTER OVERVIEW Use Power Point Slide 2-1 here In the first chapter, we explored the marketing process by which companies create value for the consumer in order to capture value in return. In this chapter, we look at designing customer-driven marketing strategies and constructing marketing programs. First, we look at the organization’s overall strategic planning, which guides marketing strategy and planning. Next, we discuss how marketing partners work closely with others inside and outside the firm to create value for customers. We then examine marketing strategy and planning—how marketers choose target markets, position their market offerings, develop a marketing mix, and manage their marketing programs. Lastly, we will look at the step of measuring and managing return on marketing investment. CHAPTER OBJECTIVES Use Power Point Slide 2-2 here 1. Explain company-wide strategic planning and its four steps. 2. Discuss how to design business portfolios and develop growth strategies. 3. Explain marketing’s role under strategic planning and how marketing works with its partners to create and deliver customer value. 4. Describe the elements of a customer value-driven marketing strategy and mix and the forces that influence them. 5. List the marketing management functions, including the elements of a marketing plan, and discuss the importance of measuring and managing marketing return on investment. CHAPTER OUTLINE p. 38 INTRODUCTION Starbucks began by offering coffee in a European-style coffeehouse, a “third place.” The goal was to engage customers and provide customer value. As the market grew, Starbucks chose an aggressive growth strategy to compete with everything from independent coffeehouses to fast-food restaurants. When Starbucks stumbled, it overcame the struggles by returning to its focus on customers and providing “The Starbucks Experience.” In the digital age, Starbucks works to build deep and strong relationships with customers. It engages customers by talking with them rather than at them. It builds a Starbucks brand community. Since the Great Recession and returning to a customer-centered focus, Starbucks’s revenues and profits have grown. This outcome seems to confirm the wisdom of Starbucks’s marketing strategy. p. 39 Photo: Starbucks  Assignments, Resources Use Small Group Assignment 1 here Use Individual Assignment 1 here  Opening Vignette Questions 1. Discuss Starbucks’s marketing strategy in terms of delivering increased customer value. What is inherently better about the current Starbucks marketing from the customer’s point of view? 2. For a while, Starbucks lost its “cool” factor. Based on your experience and perception, has the company gotten it back? Why or why not? 3. What comes next for Starbucks in the 21st century? What new marketing strategies might the company develop to remain fresh and relevant? p. 40 PPT 2-3 PPT 2-4 PPT 2-5 Explain company-wide strategic planning and its four steps. COMPANY-WIDE STRATEGIC PLANNING: DEFINING MARKETING’S ROLE The hard task of selecting an overall company strategy for long-run survival and growth is called strategic planning. Strategic planning is the process of developing and maintaining a strategic fit between the organization’s goals and capabilities and its changing market opportunities. Strategic planning sets the stage for the rest of the planning in the firm. Companies typically prepare annual plans, long-range plans, and strategic plans. At the corporate level, the company starts the strategic planning process by defining its overall purpose and mission (see Figure 2.1). It then creates detailed supporting objectives that guide the entire company. Next, headquarters decides what portfolio of businesses and products is best for the company and how much support to give each one. In turn, each business and product develops detailed marketing and other departmental plans that support the company-wide plan. Thus, marketing planning occurs at the business-unit, product, and market levels. Learning Objective 1 p. 40 Key Term: Strategic planning p. 41 Figure 2.1: Steps in Strategic Planning  Assignment, Resources Use Discussion Question 2-1 here Use Video Case here  Troubleshooting Tip Most students have had no experience with strategy or strategy formulation (especially at the under-graduate level). Because their background in strategy is weak, their ability to strategically plan is also weak. The best way to attack this problem is to follow the explanation sequence provided by the text. Before this discussion begins, however, it might be useful to find areas where students have had strategic planning experience (such as athletics, student politics, games, video games, chess, computer games, etc.). By asking the students to recall and relate these experiences, parallels can be drawn to business strategies and the plans that result from these strategies (for example, think of all the military and athletic terms that might be used to describe a business strategy—i.e., flanker movement for flanker brands). p. 40 PPT 2-6 Defining a Market-Oriented Mission Many organizations develop formal mission statements. A mission statement is a statement of the organization’s purpose—what it wants to accomplish in the larger environment. A clear mission statement acts as an “invisible hand” that guides people in the organization. A market-oriented mission statement defines the business in terms of satisfying basic customer needs. Management should avoid making its mission too narrow or too broad. Missions should be realistic, specific, consistent with the market environment, based on the company’s distinctive competencies, and motivating. p. 41 Key Term: Mission statement p. 41 Table 2.1: Product- versus Market-Oriented Business Definitions  Assignments, Resources Use Critical Thinking Exercise 2-8 here p. 42 PPT 2-7 p. 42 PPT 2-8 PPT 2-9 Setting Company Objectives and Goals The company’s mission needs to be turned into detailed supporting objectives for each level of management. The mission leads to a hierarchy of objectives, including business objectives and marketing objectives. Marketing strategies and programs must be developed to support these marketing objectives. Review Learning Objective 1: Explain company-wide strategic planning and its four steps. Discuss how to design business portfolios and develop growth strategies. Designing the Business Portfolio A business portfolio is the collection of businesses and products that make up the company. The best portfolio is the one that best fits the company’s strengths and weaknesses to opportunities in the environment. p. 42 Photo: CVS Health Learning Objective 2 p. 43 Key Term: Business portfolio  Assignments, Resources Use Real Marketing 2.1 here Use Additional Project 1 here Use Think-Pair-Share 1 here p. 43 p. 45 PPT 2-10 PPT 2-11 PPT 2-12 Analyzing the Current Business Portfolio The major activity in strategic planning is business portfolio analysis, whereby management evaluates the products and businesses making up the company. The first step in business portfolio analysis is to identify the key businesses that make up the company, the strategic business units (SBUs). An SBU can be a company division, a product line within a division, or a single product or brand. The next step in business portfolio analysis calls for management to assess the attractiveness of its various SBUs and decide how much support each deserves. Most standard portfolio-analysis methods evaluate SBUs on two important dimensions—the attractiveness of the SBU’s market or industry and the strength of the SBU’s position in that market or industry. The Boston Consulting Group Approach. The best-known portfolio-planning method was developed by the Boston Consulting Group. This matrix defines four types of SBUs: • Stars: high-growth market, high-share product • Cash cows: low-growth market, high-share product • Question marks: low-share product, high-growth market • Dogs: low-share product, low-growth market Once it has classified its SBUs, the company must determine what role each will play in the future. The company can invest more in the business unit in order to grow its share. It can invest just enough to hold the SBU’s share at the current level. It can harvest the SBU, milking its short-term cash flow regardless of the long-term effect. Or, it can divest the SBU by selling it or phasing it out. p. 43 Key Terms: Portfolio analysis p. 43 Key Term: Growth-share matrix p. 45 Figure 2.2: The BCG Growth-Share Matrix  Assignments, Resources Use Discussion Question 2-2 here Use Small Group Assignment 2 here Use Individual Assignment 2 here  Troubleshooting Tip This simple matrix is the basis for many portfolio analysis techniques. An easy way to cover this material quickly is to assign each of the four parts to four students prior to class. Next, have them respond to example suggestions (illustrations of the four cells) from their classmates. This will reinforce the material for the entire class. p. 46 PPT 2-13 p. 46 PPT 2-14 PPT 2-15 Problems with Matrix Approaches Portfolio-analysis approaches have limitations. • They can be difficult, time-consuming, and costly to implement. • Management may find it difficult to define SBUs and measure market share and growth. • These approaches focus on classifying current businesses but provide little advice for future planning. Because of such problems, many companies have dropped formal matrix methods in favor of more customized approaches that are better suited to their specific situations. Developing Strategies for Growth and Downsizing Designing the business portfolio involves finding businesses and products the company should consider in the future. Marketing has the main responsibility for achieving profitable growth for the company. Marketing must identify, evaluate, and select market opportunities and lay down strategies for capturing them. The product/market expansion grid looks for new opportunities. The product/market expansion grid is shown in Figure 2.3. • Market penetration involves making more sales to current customers without changing the product. • Market development involves identifying and developing new markets for its current products. • Product development involves offering modified or new products to current markets. • Diversification involves a company starting up or buying businesses outside of its current products and markets. p. 46 Photo: GE p. 47 Figure 2.3: The Product/Market Expansion Grid p. 46 Key Term: Product/market expansion grid p. 47 Key Terms: Market penetration, market development, product development, diversification p. 47 Ad: Under Armour PPT 2-16 Companies must also develop strategies for downsizing their businesses. The company must carefully prune, harvest, or divest brands or businesses that no longer fit its overall strategy or are unprofitable. Review Learning Objective 2: Discuss how to design business portfolios and develop growth strategies.  Assignments, Resources Use Critical Thinking Exercise 2-6 here Use Online, Mobile, and Social Media Marketing here Use Marketing Ethics here  Troubleshooting Tip Many students will have an incomplete under-standing of the growth strategies shown in the product/market expansion grid. Though these areas are carefully described in the text, it is useful to make sure that students understand the mix of alternatives available to the strategist. One way to do this is to pick another example besides the Under Armour example used in the text and have the students suggest acceptable alternatives. Remind students to think about how the example companies have expanded or contracted in recent years. Lastly, make students practice using the terms from the expansion grid in their discussions so a proper business strategy vocabulary will be built. This practice will really help the students when an exam rolls around. p. 48 PPT 2-17 p. 48 PPT 2-18 PPT 2-19 p. 49 PPT 2-20 Explain marketing’s role in strategic planning and how marketing works with its partners to create and deliver customer value. PLANNING MARKETING: PARTNERING TO BUILD CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS Within each business unit, more detailed planning takes place. The major functional departments in each unit must work together to accomplish strategic objectives. Marketing provides a guiding philosophy—the marketing concept—that suggests that company strategy should revolve around building profitable relationships with important customer groups. Marketing provides inputs to strategic planners by helping to identify attractive market opportunities and by assessing the firm’s potential to take advantage of them. Marketing designs strategies for reaching the unit’s objectives. Partnering with Other Company Departments Each company department can be thought of as a link in the company’s value chain. A value chain is the series of departments that carry out value-creating activities to design, produce, market, deliver, and support the firm’s products. A company’s value chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Success depends on how well each department performs its work of adding customer value and on how well the activities of various departments are coordinated. In practice, departmental relations are full of conflicts and misunderstandings. Partnering with Others in the Marketing System The firm needs to look beyond its own value chain and into the value chains of its suppliers, distributors, and, ultimately, its customers. More companies today are partnering with other members of the supply chain to improve the performance of the customer value delivery network. Increasingly, today’s competition no longer takes place between individual competitors. Rather, it takes place between the entire value-delivery networks created by these competitors. Review Learning Objective 3: Explain marketing’s role in strategic planning and how marketing works with its partners to create and deliver customer value. Learning Objective 3 p. 48 Key Term: Value chain p. 49 Ad: True Value p. 50 Key Term: Value delivery network

Preview 3 out of 28  pages

avatar-seller
GradeA

The benefits of buying summaries with Stuvia:

Guaranteed quality through customer reviews

Guaranteed quality through customer reviews

Stuvia customers have reviewed more than 450,000 summaries. This how you know that you are buying the best documents.

Quick and easy check-out

Quick and easy check-out

You can quickly pay through credit card or Stuvia-credit for the summaries. There is no membership needed.

Focus on what matters

Focus on what matters

Your fellow students write the study notes themselves, which is why the documents are always reliable and up-to-date. This ensures you quickly get to the core!

$ 15.49
  • (0)
  Add to cart